Jim Lee Demonstrating Line Weight and Shading

Jim Lee Demonstrating Line Weight and Shading



line weights very quickly it's all about lighting so if you have an object and it's a can okay it's in space on a surface all right with a light source okay and we're gonna Inc this to make it look as three-dimensional as possible okay we can put a thicker line furthest away from the light source and modulate it I'm by modulating I mean go from thick to thin so this lid here casts a slight shadow thinner over there and if you notice I'd even draw the other side it left the kind of open so you could be just as something very thin like that okay it's almost the light is so intense there it's kind of knocked out that line you don't you have to see the line the Iowa actually a mind will actually fill in the shape for us right and then this can I say cast a shadow like this will create a gray like a gray for value out of five all right so that's pretty simple pretty basic start with the basics take your line away thinner line closest to does that make sense it better cuz I can't really explain it any any more simply than that okay that's the same way this plane the surface is black and this surface is either white or let's say a level two gray okay so do you understand this concept that in a two-dimensional drawing the only way we can create depth is by fooling the eye using black white and gray to create three-dimensional space and then we're creating this three-dimensional space using pure black maybe 75% black maybe 40% black okay all right so you understand this concept of of a thick black bar semi thick and a less thick back bar even though they're the same size this and this bar here this one is perceived to be a thicker bar because of how dense the black is there right so then if you're doing something like a shoulder okay which is a sphere like a weird sphere almost kind of like a heart and then it has a tricep in here which looks got a weird tooth and then the bicep in the front and then the socket for the elbow and then the muscle that goes from this gigantic muscle right here and so there's that muscle there that I just showed you it goes from the back of the elbow across across the front part of the forearm let me see if I can hear it's this one right here oh I miss the line you can see it the lines right there all right and then their muscles that come out of here so there's that tricep line that was just doing right here all right that's this line right here got it okay so here's the rest of that forearm down to the wrist okay that's the back muscles it's just the muscles that go to the neck the side of that right this is the back of the arm if you guys haven't figured out light sources here so again the things closest to that light source I'm gonna have a thin line or not even a line because it's so blown out but the things away from this especially if there's a shape we're gonna cast a shadow now shadows have gonna have a particular kind of shape because of the wider the valley the wider the shadow right the the more sharply pronounced a cliff is right so if it's flatter here and it's that the valleys deepest here it's gonna create it it's gonna create a kind of a gaping shadow like that this elbo sock it's gonna create a little shadow right and just like how we did a thicker line on that cylinder the side in general it's gonna get a thicker line because the light source is up here there's reflected light that comes here reflected light is light that bounces light basically goes from that object like ray particles rays actually the light hits walls or objects and bounces back this way with reduced strength but what it does is it illuminates you know in general that's why you get double double lit things so if there's a light source you can still see things over here because there's light being bounced off of objects over this way or a second light source could be a second artificial light source so rather than going and just doing one solid black line like that you could do that here but on this I'm not going to do a solid black line up in down this whole thing I'm going to go lighter at the top because of this bounced light that's coming this way and just do something darker underneath like this okay and then it gets lighter again because the lights hitting it again are this lights hitting it so I'll catch the underside of that bicep the underside of this shoulder muscle underside of this forearm this muscle that I drew here will cast a little shadow a couple things like that okay in general most things get thicker towards the bottom here's where it gets a little tricky and this so this is line weights all right line weights is intimately involved with related to shadows right so this is a line weight but it's also shadow this is definitely a shadow this is a line weight okay once you have your line weights down you start deciding well how heavily shadowed is this where is this light source there's an object okay and the light source is here right you're gonna be a shadow on this may be a slight shadow over here as this light source rotates around in space all right three dimensionally right that the shadows can become more pronounced so when this light source is right about there this whole thing is gonna be black all right and cast a shadow this way does that make sense better all right so the same thought is I have the cylinder I have this light source so depending on where this light source is will affect whether this is mostly black or hardly any black so that's if it's parked right about here it's part in that position there what happens is this sort of heart-like thing the shadow creeps up like a sundial and you start seeing all these shadows that I placed elongate and then even connect up and if there's Bounce lighting you'll get rim lighting here like that so that the shadows doesn't go they don't go all the way to the edge but if you don't if you have a weak secondary light source or not much foreign lighting it goes all the way the black here got it and because this can look very graphical or kind of hard edged a lot of people would differ differ in the line with a brush or marker and create this kind of intermediary gray along the edge kind of transitioning from a pure black to white okay and you can do it kind of this like alligator teeth kind of effect or you can do something that's a little more pulled out if you want I accomplished the same thing you can use a combination of both a lot of people like kind of dithering and pulling lines out of it okay but realize as you add lines you're creating a gray value but you're also creating a flatness right depending on if the line is curved you'll create curved nough so I would suggest having a slight curvature to the line but if you put something that's flat you're laying down both a gray value and also creating a plane you're flattening out this 3-dimensional shape that is essentially tubular some wonder if goal so you just got to be careful and be aware of that so I would suggest doing a slight curve and I'm gonna exaggerate it here hopefully you guys can see that a curvature that I'm putting in exaggerating it right now it looks very rendered it looks very kind of early 90s gimli or image style whatever you want to call it it kind of came from Barry windsor-smith but again going back to the line weights I'm going to do more of it towards the bottom of the form to add that weight and that's why it's called line weight create weights and volume and that typically goes to a black right black value so it's just about layering on texture in the service of creating shadows creating values creating weights creating the illusion of light all these things kind of interact together okay and then you could take white out and you can work against your Gray's create positive shapes on using white in a crude laboratory in the basement of his home