Breast Biopsy Incisional

Breast Biopsy Incisional


Your doctor has recommended that you undergo
a breast biopsy procedure – or lumpectomy. In your case, you have lump or thickening
in your breast. It was felt by you or your doctor during a
routine breast exam or discovered following a mammogram. Let’s take a moment to look at
the reasons why lumps form in breast tissue. The breast is made of layers of skin, fat
and breast tissue – all of which overlay the pectoralis muscle. Breast tissue itself is
made up of a network of tiny-milk carrying ducts and there are three ways in which a
lump can form among them. Most women experience periodic changes to
their breasts. Cysts are some of the most common kinds of tissues that can grow large
enough to be felt and to cause tenderness. Cysts often grow and then shrink without any
medical intervention. A second kind of lump is caused by changes
in breast tissue triggered by the growth of a cyst. Even after the cyst itself has gone
away, it can leave fibrous tissue behind. This scar tissue can often be large enough
to be felt. The third kind of growth is a tumor. Tumors
can be either benign or cancerous and it is concern about this type of growth that has
lead your doctor to recommend breast biopsy. Sometimes you will have breast changes that
can not be felt by physical examination alone; but may be seen on a mammogram. On the day of your operation, you will be
asked to put on a surgical gown. You may receive a sedative by mouth and an
intravenous line may be put in. You will then be transferred to the operating
table. Your doctor will scrub thoroughly and will
apply an antiseptic solution to the skin around the area where the incision will be made. Then, the doctor will place a sterile drape
or towels around the operative site . . . . . . and will inject a local anesthetic. This may sting a bit, but your breast will
quickly begin to feel numb. Usually, the surgeon will inject more than one spot – in order
to make sure that the entire area is thoroughly numb. After allowing a few minutes for the anesthetic
to take effect, the surgeon will make a small incision. Once the incision has been made, your doctor
will begin looking for the lump that is to be removed. You will feel some pressure or even slight
tugging or pulling – but you should not feel any sharp pain. If you do begin to feel pain,
you should tell the doctor and you will be given more anesthetic. Once the lump is removed, the doctor will
close the skin over the incision as neatly and as cosmetically as they are able. Finally, a sterile dressing is applied. Your specimen will be sent immediately to
a lab for microscopic analysis. Your doctor will tell you when to expect result from those
tests.